this week's announcements

youth yard sale

The annual youth yard sale is this Friday, 9/22 & Saturday, 9/23.  Items can be dropped off at the church this week.  Contact lonniecolemcgee@gmail.com, if you have large items that you need picked up for a $20 donation.

 

church BBQ!

Our annual church BBQ is Saturday, October 7th from 5:30-8:30pm out on the back lawn.  We invite Via and our neighbors to join us.  The church will provide the meat, cheesy potatoes, cole slaw, drinks, ‘smores and the FUN!  Please bring a side dish to share.  Cost is $5/person or $20/family max. 

 

Exploring the Enneagram- beginning October 4th. 

The Enneagram is a system of personality that describes nine distinct ways of thinking, feeling, and acting in the world. This class is ideal for those who desire to better understand the unconscious patterns that operate in their lives and the lives of others. Consider taking the class with your small group or friends. 

Redemption Church is hosting an Enneagram class this fall. The 5 week class will be held on Wednesday evenings starting on October 4 at 7:00pm. Jim Gum, executive pastor at Jacob's Well and certified Enneagram teacher, will be leading. For more information please email Mandy Hill at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com.  Register at redemptionchurchkc.com/learning-together/.

 

CarePortal

Global Orphan project's CarePortal connects Redemption Church to children and families in crisis in the foster care system in Johnson County. Information: redemptionchurchkc.com/care-portal or contact Tracy Tennisat tnjtenis@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

"Ordinary Time 13: Joseph" - Ann Morrill

Pentecost Sermon Graphic.jpg

"Ordinary Time 13: Joseph

by Ann Morrill

9/17/17

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Outline of Sermon

Introduction

  • 11 years ago – Oct. 2, 2006

  • Events in Nickel Mines, PA STUNNED THE NATION

    • Brutality – Target -- RESPONSE

  • 10:30 A.M. – Charles Carl Roberts – milk delivery man – known/respected – entered 1 room Amish school

    • Boys – help unloading truck

      • Guns, ammunition, plastic ties, wire, lumber, nails and tools

      • Let them go

    • Barricaded himself inside

    • Lined up girls ages 6-13 against chalkboard – tied together with wire and plastic ties

    • Beginning at 11:07 – took the first of at least 13 shots – the last one saved for himself

    • Efforts by state troopers to talk him out of it would not work – 2.5 minutes after shooting began, they stormed the room

    • 5 girls died

      • 3 that day

      • 2 the next morning

      • Notes found later: Angry at God -- baby girl died

      • Chose to take it out on young women from a community steeped in faith in the God he blamed

    • Grief and shock enveloped the community.

      • How could father who kissed his own children goodbye do such a thing?

      • How had his wife and co-workers missed the signs?  

      • If he understood the pain of losing a daughter, why would he want to inflict the same on others?

For many of those questions, good answers may never be found

  • Greatest shock

    • NOT the crime

    • NOT death of innocents at the hands of a madman.

    • GREATEST shock: forgiveness and support to the family of the mad man who did this to them.

    • Time and time again – Amish offered grace …

      • Grandfather of one victim -- “We must not think evil of this man.”  

      • A father trying to explain his ability to forgive said, "He had a mother and a wife and a soul and now he's standing before a just God."

      • Several from the Amish community left their homes to give support to his family – the same day of the shooting.

        • One Amish man held the shooter’s father while he sobbed.

        • 30 Amish attended his funeral.  

      • Roberts’ widow was one of very few outsiders invited or allowed to attend the funerals of any of the slain

      • His family was SO touched both his mother and his wife have actively testified to the power of grace. His mother published a book named “Forgiven”

    • Response of nation: AWE

      • How could anyone who had suffered this loss forgive so quickly?

      • What would give them the strength to do that?

      • Why would they even think it appropriate?  

      • What became of justice?

      • Why didn’t they even ask the normal “why?” questions?

        • Why didn’t someone know?

        • Why hadn’t they stopped him?

        • Why us? Why now?

    • In a national culture that seeks to assign blame and routinely files multi-million dollar lawsuits for things as small as spilled hot coffee – the consistent message of forgiveness offered across the Amish community seemed unthinkable.  

      • Everyone asked, “How could they do that?”  -- But they were!

      • And, in that moment, our nation was forced to imagine a better way – a way that redeemed evil for good; one that brought beauty out of pain.

      • It was, perhaps, the best day for Christianity in modern U.S. history

(Imagination …)

  • When we came to Redemption -- 3 years ago – began to hear the word “imagination” a lot.  

    • Tim routinely challenges us to enlarge our imagination – to open our minds and consider new ways of thinking about things – new solutions to age-old problems.  

    • Must admit – the Amish story challenges my imagination.  

      • I’ve had a hard time forgiving MUCH less.

      • Imagining the pain of a parent and strength to forgive is beyond me.

      • I can try to imagine horror and anger and profound grief.

      • But forgiveness? That’s much harder to come by.  

    • Same problem -- stories in scripture – Whether it is extreme faith, perseverance in suffering, or forgiveness on the magnitude of the Amish.    

We’re going to look at a story with all of those today.   

But first -- want to spend just a couple of minutes talking about why I think it is SO important for us to try to place ourselves in this story – to imagine what it would have been like to be the main character.

  • One of the books that has helped me most in my personal walk is Dallas Willard’s “Hearing God.”

    • Willard -- profound thinker – a Christian who taught philosophy at the University of Southern California.

    • His writing normally makes my head hurt because it is so deep.  

    • But this book is accessible.

  • Willard explains that he wrote the book because a personal discussion in his own family taught him how few Christians genuinely experience the intimacy of a close, personal walk with God. And, without that – they struggle to experience a deeply transformed life.  

    • In trying to address one of the root causes for that problem – he points our attention to a very short passage in the book of James.

    • It contains a phrase with incredible power – but one that we often overlook.

    • In this passage, James is urging his readers to pray for sick – and believe that prayer will make a difference.  (specifically -- elders pray)

 

13 Is anyone among you in trouble? Let them pray. Is anyone happy? Let them sing songs of praise. 14 Is anyone among you sick? Let them call the elders of the church to pray over them and anoint them with oil in the name of the Lord. …16b The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective.

17 Elijah was a human being, even as we are. He prayed earnestly that it would not rain, and it did not rain on the land for three and a half years.18 Again he prayed, and the heavens gave rain, and the earth produced its crops.

James 5:13-14, 16b-18

    • “Elijah was a human being, even as we are.”  

      • For James, that settled it.

      • If Elijah could pray and things happened, so could we.  

      • Obviously – we could do study of prayer but that’s not our focus today.

      • Larger principle applies.  

      • We MUST read scripture with fresh eyes – see heroes as people who were just like us.  

    • Willard, in explaining how scripture becomes meaningful in our own lives says it this way:  

“We must prayerfully but boldly use our God-given imaginations as we read the stories of people who encountered God.  We must ask ourselves what it would be like if we were Moses standing by the bush (Ex. 3:2), little Samuel lying in his darkened room (1 Sam. 3:3-7), Elisha under inspiration from the minstrel (2 Kings 3:15), Ananias receiving his vision about Paul (Acts 9:11) or Peter on his rooftop (Acts 10:10).   We must pray for the faith and for the experiences that would enable us to believe that such things could happen to us. Only then will we be able to recognize, accept and dwell in them when they come. …”   (Dallas Willard, Hearing God, p. 36)

  • Willard was teaching about the ability to hear God’s direction and know His will.

  • If this approach is true of hearing God – surely it is true of growing and exercising faith in the face of our circumstances.



 

So – for the next few minutes – want to look at Joseph:

  • Hero of Old Testament history.  

    • Story – contains forgiveness nearly as profound as Amish

    • Perhaps – if we can imagine ourselves in shoes of Joseph – and subsequently the Amish – we can begin to imagine the heart God calls us to have toward others – those who have hurt us, offended us, betrayed us or rejected our values.

Won’t read entire text of Joseph’s story – but we need a brief review – need to be on the same page!

  • Joseph entered the world, through no fault of his own, in competition for his father Jacob’s attention.  

    • As son of favorite wife -- Instantly loved

    • Jacob could not help but shower him with attention and lavish gifts.

      • Most prominent gift -- elaborate coat – “Many colors”

      • Outwardly good news for Joseph – but instant source of conflict with his brothers.  

      • They resented his favored treatment.

    • If Joseph was more mature – would have recognized the danger of jealousy & laid low

    • As a brash young man – who relished status -- he did not.

      • Continued to accept assignments to check on his brothers and report back to his father about their work

      • Not only wore the coat  -- BUT – became “tattle tale” – reporting their transgressions back to his dad. (Gen. 37:1-4).

  • In the midst of this very human conflict,

    • Two dreams -- one message.

      • His family – brothers and father included – would bow down to him.

    • This was scandalous!  

      • Their culture: Age mattered

      • It defined rank and authority.  

      • No father, let alone older brother would agree to serve the younger.

      • It was bad enough that he was their father’s favorite – a snitch who was gifted with designer clothing.  

      • But, the thought of bowing to his rule was beyond their imagination.

      • His outlandish claims caused them to hate him even more (Gen. 37:8).

      • Even his father Jacob rebuked him for believing his dream (Gen. 37:10).

    • Joseph’s brothers simply seethed.

      • “Plotted to kill him” (37:18).   

      • Instead -- sold to Midianite merchants who would carry him far away.

Brothers, no doubt, thought the dream was dead.

But, it wasn’t.

Joseph’s dream would be fulfilled.

  • Joseph -- just 17 years old when dreams interrupted his sleep

  • If Joseph could just fast-forward to the end of the story, it would all be great.

  • He would move from being the favored son of his father to the one in power over not only over the family but an entire nation.

But, life did not move at the speed of fast forward.

This is where it becomes important for us to slow down and try to put ourselves in Joseph’s shoes before we jump to the point of today’s reading.

  • Some danger in doing that!

  • Yet, human emotions are so universal, I trust we can do so fairly

  • When you try to put yourself in Joseph’s place, what comes to mind?

  • First thing I think of – LOST control

    • Sold NOT once – but twice.  He had absolutely no control.

      • Me – from a very young age -- “I’ll do it myself”

      • One of hardest parts of this summer’s broken leg – dependence  

    • Living completely at discretion of others had to be abhorrent to Joseph.

  • Second thing I think of – Alienation and isolation

    • Rather than living as the son of a well-to-do rancher surrounded by family – father, brothers, in-laws, nieces and nephews – he was alienated from all family with little hope of seeing them again.

      • NO way to reach them – no hope of hearing their voice.

      • NO way to COMFORT dad.  

        • Could not call, text or send a letter saying, “I’m fine. They’re treating me well. I’m getting three square meals a day.”  

    • Beyond alienation from family – Isolation from others

      • Yes, he worked with/for people

      • But they were strangers -- no reason to care.

      • Studies of human stress -- hormones tell us to be social.

        • We need each other to get through tough stuff.

        • Do you think they cared why he was sold?

          • …that he was betrayed by family?

          • …that he left behind a father consumed by grief?

        • Would they care that he thought God had spoken to him and called him to greatness?

        • Would it bother them that his dreams were dashed the minute they paid to purchase him?

      • The truth is, I suspect they would laugh in his face.  

  • If those aren’t enough – consider living in foreign land – unprepared

    • Under other circumstances visiting Egypt could be an adventure – a chance to explore an exotic country that was thriving.   

    • But this trip – not an adventure.   

      • NOT temporary

      • DIDN’T SHARE culture, faith and language

      • CAME WITH NOTHING -- PERHAPS not even a change of clothing.

      • Although he lived in a place vibrantly alive for its time, Joseph was an alien – alone in every way that mattered.

 

  • For a while, it appeared lucky that he landed in the house of Potiphar, captain of the guard.

    • He worked hard and was rewarded for it.

    • All was going as well as he could hope until Potiphar’s wife tried to seduce him

    • When he did the RIGHT thing (fled her advances) – he was wrongly accused of rape

    • Punished without a trial

    • Sentenced to prison for a crime he didn’t do.  

(The challenge for us: don’t let familiarity with ending short-circuit the meaning here!)

  • If Joseph was human like me -- had to be at least a little angry

    • At life – even at God

    • He had done what was right –

      • Told the truth to his dad,

      • Worked hard for his employer,

      • Took moral high road

      • Still punished.

    • Surely, anger turned on his brothers.

      • They were ultimately responsible.

      • Yes -- Potiphar’s wife was dishonest, disloyal, and immoral.  

        • That was bad.

        • But he was just a servant to her

      • His brothers? They were family?  Blood relation.  He expected more of them.

    • Many of us FIXATE on those we hold responsible. We feed the resentment for years.

      • I suspect for most of us -- It would have festered until it boiled over if/when they ever saw those brothers again.

      • Until then – it would almost certainly affect life

        • It could drain energy to point that we would give half-hearted effort

        • We’d have a hard time trusting anyone – hard time showing respect

        • We might question our faith – question God

        • Ask – “what good does it do?”

 

  • We don’t know just how much Joseph was tempted to all of these – DO KNOW he wasn’t numb to the pain

    • Later – when he named his children –

      • Called one Manasseh – “God has made me forget all my trouble and all my father’s household.”

      • Called one Ephraim -- “God has made me fruitful in the land of my suffering.”

  • Yet – in all that time, Joseph didn’t give up on God – didn’t give up on life

    • More than once we’re told he won respect for his work  AND “God gave him favor”

    • We know he held onto faith

      • When given chance to interpret dreams first for friends then for Pharaoh, he did not hesitate to act – nor to ask God for help

      • I can’t help but wonder if God set up the interpretation of dreams just to let Joseph know He had not forgotten Joseph or his dreams!

  • You know the story -- Predicted 7 years of plenty followed by 7 of famine

  • Joseph wisely advised: STORE UP FOOD

  • Pharaoh rewarded his wisdom – put him in charge

  • Finally – thirteen years after he was sold into slavery – he entered the service of Pharaoh where he rose to the top echelons of power.

    • This was a step in the right direction

    • Regained control over circumstances.  Could choose

      • Where he wanted to go,

      • What he wanted to eat,

      • How he would spend his day.  

      • He could marry – and he did.  

    • But, Joseph still didn’t have extended family. And, despite name of Manasseh, he hadn’t forgotten – only swept it aside.

 

It was 22 years before he laid eyes on his family. From the time he entered power, Joseph would reign nine more years (the 7 years of “plenty” plus 2 years needed for food to become scarce in his homeland) before his brothers came calling -- begging for food.  

  • You likely remember the story.

    • His brothers didn’t know him – but he knew them.  

    • 1st journey -- After toying with them and forcing one brother to stay, he let the rest go – knowing they’d be back.

    • 2nd – came back (he knew they would) – this time with his youngest brother – the one he wanted to see most.

    • As Joseph observed them and recognized hearts that had changed, he could hold out no longer – he sent the Egyptians out of the room to preserve a private reunion with this brothers. As tears rolled down his cheeks, he revealed his identity, hugged them warmly, forgave them fully, and ultimately arranged to move all of them – including his aging father – to Egypt.  

  • We LOVE this part of the story.  All’s well that ends well.

    • But I don’t want to gloss over pain along the way or fail to marvel at his response!  

    • The minute Joseph revealed himself – he let them off the hook

      • No questions

      • No blame game

      • Not even a recitation of all he went through

      • Just tears of joy – and utter forgiveness.

      • We might be tempted to think – “Of course. He’s living the sweet life – and God had this planned all along”

      • But to stop there short circuits reality.

      • Joseph spent 22 years alienated from his family – not knowing if his dad was alive or dead.

      • He spent 22 years isolated from those who shared his language or faith

      • Missed birthdays, holidays, weddings and deaths

      • Didn’t get to watch nieces and nephews grow up

      • His own children were robbed of experience of grandfather, aunts, uncles and cousins

      • While they were together and thriving -- he spent 13 years as a slave – many of them in prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

      • We tend to look at outcome – know it turns out okay

      • In the middle of it? He couldn’t see – didn’t know!

      • Still forgave!

  • Today’s reading comes from the second declaration of forgiveness.

    • Occasion – death of Jacob – Joseph’s father.

    • Joseph had expressed forgiveness years earlier.

    • But, recognizing their own guilt – Joseph’s brothers were once again afraid. With Dad gone, he could finally seek revenge  

Read with me:

15 When Joseph’s brothers saw that their father was dead, they said, “What if Joseph holds a grudge against us and pays us back for all the wrongs we did to him?” 16 So they sent word to Joseph, saying, “Your father left these instructions before he died: 17 ‘This is what you are to say to Joseph: I ask you to forgive your brothers the sins and the wrongs they committed in treating you so badly.’ Now please forgive the sins of the servants of the God of your father.” When their message came to him, Joseph wept.

18 His brothers then came and threw themselves down before him. “We are your slaves,” they said.

19 But Joseph said to them, “Don’t be afraid. Am I in the place of God?20 You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives. 21 So then, don’t be afraid. I will provide for you and your children.” And he reassured them and spoke kindly to them.

 

So, Joseph made the choice echoed thousands of years later by the Amish; he conveyed his forgiveness again.

  • And it was real.

  • Forgiveness so permeated his heart that he wept at the thought they were afraid of him.

How did Joseph do that? How did he, like the Amish years later, find a way to release the desire for revenge and choose forgiveness instead?

I have a very hard time imagining strength like that.

What makes forgiveness of this kind possible?

Can anything make grace reasonable for brothers who sell their own? … for killers who shoot innocent girls?

Why would he – or we -- want to offer grace when everything cries out for justice?  

Two phrases in this passage catch my eye. – If any hope of cultivating the heart of grace that we see in Joseph – we’ll need to fully embrace lessons found here.

  • First phrase is this: “Am I in the place of God?”

    • Key to Joseph’s forgiveness – key to his behavior throughout time in captivity – is humble recognition of his own position.  

      • There is a God

      • I’m NOT him

        • Life is NOT about me

        • Something bigger is going on here

        • Someone wiser is in control

      • Seems obvious – but I think this recognition is at the root of MUCH human struggle.

        • I said earlier – we like control

        • Joseph did, too!  Why else would he brag to his brothers about his dreams?

      • But, by the time he is reunited with them – life has been put in perspective and he’s embraced the purpose and role God has given him. He’s no longer tempted to more.

 

  • For Joseph – this confession – revealed at least two important truths: One is implied by his forgiveness; the other explained by his words.

  • Look at what he says immediately after confessing he’s NOT God.

 

“You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good”

 

    • Joseph understood that as a child of God – he had a purpose bigger than his own comfort and passing happiness. He could have been angry that God let him suffer at the hands of his brothers but he wasn’t.  

      • He had a role to play in the plans of God for his people on earth.

      • At this time, he could not begin to know how important that role was to world history

      • But, he knew it mattered for now.

      • His family lived because he was sent ahead to preserve food to survive the famine

      • In truth – he lived because he was sent ahead

      • God could see a famine coming and need to prepare a way to preserve his people

      • Joseph played a part

    • I don’t begin to understand all the implications of this. Lots of questions remain.

    • But, there’s one thing I do know – when I view my life – my purpose – as being about something bigger than my comfort, my happiness, my pleasure – the hard times look a LOT different.

      • No longer do I judge every action – every event, every hurt, every struggle, every frustration, every time of opposition through the same light.

      • In fact, I no longer expect life to be easy.

        • Jesus said, after all, “Take up your cross and follow me.”

        • He didn’t promise a life of ease.  

        • He DOES routinely redeem suffering for good.

      • So, on those too often rare days when I live in the humility of Joseph, I find it easier to believe that God is in the process of redeeming the hard times for good – even when I can’t see how.

      • And, I’m forced to stop and ask, “How can this be used to further God’s purpose on earth?”

Beyond Joseph’s recognition that God alone is wise enough to set the purpose and plan, his confession reveals one more important truth.  

  • When Joseph said, “Am I in the place of God?” and followed those words with forgiveness, his action clearly proclaimed – “I’m NOT judge and jury; it is not my place to punish you.”

    • Joseph understood:

      • God alone is in position to judge the hearts of men

      • God alone knows their motives

      • God alone can exact righteous judgment

If that’s true for Joseph – given all he’d been through -- it’s surely true for us!

    • But, it didn’t stop there.  He also understood that God is more interested in redemption than in punishment.

    • If that is true of God – and we’re called to be his hands and feet on earth -- it needs to be true of us. We’re called to be agents of grace -- more interested in the redemption of those who oppose us, who threaten us, who harm us – than in revenge.

      • We pray – in the Lord’s prayer – “Your kingdom come, your will be done.”

      • Can you imagine a more vivid display of his kingdom than the grace of the Amish?

      • Can you imagine a more effective tool against hate than love?

      • Is there anything else that would entice them to imagine a better way?

      • I can think of nothing more powerful than a vivid picture of grace.

 

Before we go any farther or wrap up – which we’ll do soon, I promise, let me quickly deal with some very practical – and important questions.  Some of you are sitting here thinking, “yeah, but …” and you are wise to ask.  As important as it is to imagine hearts that flow with forgiveness and grace – we must understand what forgiveness is – and what it isn’t.

 

  • Forgiveness is releasing our right to revenge.

  • It IS the first step toward healing.

  • It does set us free from plotting payback so we can process our grief.

  • It does set the offender free from worry about our revenge.

  • It does open the door to reconciliation.

  • But, it does NOT instantly relieve pain

    • Amish – long journey – PTSD – nightmares

  • And, forgiveness does NOT instantly rebuild trust.

    • Hear this clearly – if you have lived with someone abusive – if you’ve been hurt via physical, emotional or sexual abuse, God does NOT expect you to blindly put yourself back at their mercy.  

    • Forgiveness is about the past. When you forgive, you give up the right to revenge.  Reconciliation is about the future and it can require steps to rebuild trust.

    • Your forgiveness does not absolve the abuser of consequences from the law nor does it require you to set caution aside.

    • This subject is far too complicated to cover well; just know I’m not advocating blind faith in someone who has not repented nor shown themselves trustworthy.

  • One last important observation – forgiveness does NOT proclaim “What you did doesn’t matter.”

    • It does.

    • If it didn’t, there would be no need for forgiveness.

    • The offense did matter and that is what makes forgiveness so powerful.

      • Human nature seeks revenge

      • Human nature demands justice

      • Only love – driven by the imagination of a better way --compels forgiveness.

      • Only love has the power NOT only to set the forgiver free – but the power to ultimately transform the one forgiven.  

 

I wish we had more time.  As I prepared, my material looked more like notes for an extended study – with lots of discussion – than like a message for this setting.  

 

But, as we close, I want to leave you with words of one more person I deeply admire – someone who understood the power of grace and modeled it toward others – even others who were sorely mistaken.  He had much to forgive and could have grown bitter. But when encouraged to resort to violence in pursuit of justice, he chose love.

 

Martin Luther King believed deeply that God knew best when he said “turn the other cheek, go the extra mile, love your enemy” and he explained the wisdom of God’s ways this way:

 

“The ultimate weakness of violence is that it is a descending spiral; begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy. Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it. Through violence you may murder the liar, but you cannot murder the lie, nor establish the truth. Through violence you may murder the hater, but you do not murder hate. In fact, violence merely increases hate. … Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”  MLK

                                                                  (1967, Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?)

 

He concluded:

 

“Love is the only force capable of transforming an enemy to a friend.” 

 

Our world is in desperate need of a picture of a better way.  Their imagination is NOT big enough.

The question is: -- Is ours?  Can we – ragamuffins that we are – find enough faith to reflexively lead with grace?

 

We need to ask for God’s help.  …

 

Let’s pray  

 

Father – we stand in awe of those who live lives of reflexive grace. We confess – I confess – that the forgiveness of the Amish is beyond me. Yet, I stand convicted that your ways are far wiser than my own. We long for this world to be healed – for neighbors and enemies alike to live in peace. We long for barriers to be demolished -- for the reconciliation of all those made in your name.

 

As we prepare to meet you at the table, we ask for your grace. We ask for a fresh portion of your Spirit. Invade us; convict us; compel us to forgive as we’ve been forgiven. May we be your hands and feet – messengers of grace in a world that badly needs your love.

 

We love you and are so very grateful for your promises to us.

In the name of Jesus we pray,

 

Amen

this week's announcements

men’s event

Our next men’s event is this Friday, September 15th at Lakeside Speedway in Shawnee. Cost is $12 for adults; $6 for kids 7-12, and 6 and under are free.   Meet at Lakeside speedway at 6pm. Racing starts at 7:30pm. Bring your own drinks and sides. We will provide the burgers, hot dogs and grills.  Questions, please contact Josh Madden at jmadden3377@gmail.com.

 

youth yard sale

The annual youth yard sale is Friday, 9/22 & Saturday, 9/23.  Items can be dropped off beginning Monday, September 18th.  Contact Cole at lonniecolemcgee@gmail.com, if you have large items that you need picked up for a $20 fee.

 

save the date: church bbq is saturday, october 7th

If you would like to help with this year's BBQ, please contact Beth Price at beth@redemptionchurchkc.com.

 

Exploring the Enneagram- beginning October 4th. 

The Enneagram is a system of personality that describes nine distinct ways of thinking, feeling, and acting in the world. This class is ideal for those who desire to better understand the unconscious patterns that operate in their lives and the lives of others. Consider taking the class with your small group or friends. 

Redemption Church is hosting an enneagram class this fall. The 5 week class will be held on Wednesday evenings starting on October 4, 7:00pm. Jim Gum, executive pastor at Jacob's Well and certified Enneagram teacher will be leading. For more information please email Mandy Hill at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com.  Register at redemptionchurchkc.com/learning-together/.

 

CarePortal

Global Orphan project's CarePortal connects Redemption Church to children and families in crisis in the foster care system in Johnson County. Information: redemptionchurchkc.com/care-portal or contact Tracy Tennis at tnjtennis@yahoo.com

 

this week's announcements

men’s breakfast

Men’s ministry breakfasts are back!  Our next one is this Saturday, September 9th from 8:30am to 10am in the foyer.  A $3-5 donation is requested to help cover cost of the food.

 

esl volunteers needed; no spanish necessary!

English classes begin September 11th on Monday evenings from 7-8:30pm.  Contact Mandy Hill for information at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com.

 

men’s event

Our next men’s event is next Friday, September 15th at Lakeside Speedway in Shawnee. Cost is $12 for adults; $6 for kids 7-12, and 6 and under are free.   Meet at Lakeside speedway at 6pm. Racing starts at 7:30pm. Bring your own drinks and sides. We will provide the burgers, hot dogs and grills.

 

youth yard sale

The annual youth yard sale is Friday, 9/22 & Saturday, 9/23.  Items can be dropped off beginning Monday, September 18th.  Contact Cole at lonniecolemcgee@gmail.com, if you have large items that you need picked up for a $20 fee.

 

save the date: Church BBQ is Saturday, October 7th!

 

CarePortal

Global Orphan project's CarePortal connects Redemption Church to children and families in crisis in the foster care system in Johnson County. Information: redemptionchurchkc.com/care-portal or contact Tracy Tennisat tnjtennis@yahoo.com

 

this week's announcements

mobile food pantry this saturday, september 2nd

Our mobile food pantry on the first Saturday of each month. Fresh produce is available. If you know anyone who would benefit, send them our way. The pantry opens in the parking lot at 1:00pm. If you would like to volunteer, please arrive at 12:30pm. The commitment is about 1 1/2 hours. Questions, contact Mandy at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com

 

men’s breakfast

Men’s ministry breakfasts are back!  Our next one is next Saturday, September 9th from 8:30am to 10am in the foyer.  A $3-5 donation is requested to help cover cost of the food.

 

esl volunteers needed; no spanish necessary!

English classes begin September 11th on Monday evenings from 7-8:30pm.  Contact Mandy Hill for information at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com.

 

men’s event

Our next men’s event is Friday, September 15th at Lakeside Speedway in Shawnee. Cost is $12 for adults; $6 for kids 7-12, and 6 and under are free.   Meet at Lakeside speedway at 6pm. Racing starts at 7:30pm. Bring your own drinks and sides. We will provide the burgers, hot dogs and grills.

 

save the date: Our Church BBQ is Saturday, October 7th!

 

CarePortal

Global Orphan project's CarePortal connects Redemption Church to children and families in crisis in the foster care system in Johnson County. Information: redemptionchurchkc.com/care-portal or contact Tracy Tennisat tnjtennis@yahoo.com

 

this week's announcements

youth group kick-off party!

Youth group is gearing up with our kick-off party this Wednesday, Augusts 23rd at Oregon Trail Park near the sand volleyball courts.  Please drop your student off at 7pm (pick up at 8:30pm) at the park.  We'll have hot dogs and hamburgers, play sand volleyball and hangout!  Boys bring a 2 liter soda; Girls bring a bag of chips.  Bring sports equipment or yard games if you'd like!

 

mobile food pantry saturday, september 2nd

Our mobile food pantry on the first Saturday of each month. Fresh produce is available for families in need. If you know anyone who would benefit from bags of fresh fruits & vegetables, send them our way. The pantry opens in the parking lot at 1:00pm. If you would like to volunteer, please arrive at 12:30pm. The commitment is about 1 1/2 hours. Questions, contact Mandy at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com

 

men’s breakfast

Men’s ministry breakfasts are back!  Our next one is Saturday, September 9th from 8:30am to 10am in the foyer.  A $3-5

donation is requested to help cover cost of the food.

 

men’s event

Our next men’s event is Friday, September 15th at Lakeside Speedway in Shawnee. Cost is $12 for adults; $6 for kids 7-12, and 6 and under are free.   Meet at Lakeside speedway at 6pm. Racing starts at 7:30pm. Bring your own drinks and sides. We will provide the burgers, hot dogs and grills.

 

this week's announcements

club 56 backyard bash: this Friday, August 18th
If your student is going into 5th - 7th grade in the fall they are invited to join us for a night of fun, games, movies, and pizza! It's a great time to welcome our new students and say goodbye to our older students. We will be in the backyard of Jeff Thomsen's house (10103 Redbud Lane Lenexa, KS, 66220). We will start at 6:24pm

 

promotion sunday

Next Sunday, August 20th is Promotion Sunday! We will celebrate this rite of passage for the students in our Children's Ministry at the beginning of service.  If you have a student entering kindergarten, please contact Nicole Green (nikkigreen2000@gmail.com) or if your student is entering 5th grade, contact Valerie McGee (valerie@redemptionchurchkc.com) to make sure they're included.

 

youth group kick-off party!

Youth group is gearing up with a kick-off party Wednesday, Augusts 23rd at Oregon Trail Park near the sand volleyball courts.  Please drop your student off at 7pm (pick up at 8:30pm) at the park.  We'll have hot dogs and hamburgers, play sand volleyball and hangout!  Boys bring a 2 liter soda; Girls bring a bag of chips.  Bring sports equipment or yard games if you'd like!

 

dinners for 8

Would you like to make new friends and connect with people at Redemption Church, we’re bringing back our Dinners for 8 this fall!  Contact Aaron Scott at dante42@gmail.com if you would like to be a part of these dinners.

 

sunday morning drivers for our homeless friends

Are you interested in driving one Sunday morning a month in order to bring our homeless friends to and from church?  Please contact Mandy Hill at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com for more information.

 

this week's announcements

ladies' night out tonight

TONIGHT at 7pm is Ladies' Night Out at K-Machos in Olathe (Santa Fe & Ridgeview). This is a great opportunity to meet and connect with Redemption women.  If you're planning on attending, please contact Ari Martin (913-426-8603 or arimartin1@yahoo.com) or Melissa Guinto (319-230-0522 or mguinto72@gmail.com) in order that we have plenty of seats.

 

Club 56 backyard bash:  August 18th

If your student is going into 5th - 7th grade in the fall they are invited to join us for a night of fun, games, movies, and pizza! It's a great time to welcome our new students and say goodbye to our older students. We will be in the backyard of Jeff Thomsen's house (10103 Redbud Lane Lenexa, KS, 66220). We will start at 6:24pm. 

 

Dinners for 8

Would you like to make new friends and connect with more people at Redemption Church, we're bringing back our Dinners for 8 this fall!  Please sign up in the foyer on Sunday mornings if you would like to host or simply attend a Dinner for 8.  Questions, contact Aaron Scott at dante42@gmail.com.

 

sunday morning drivers needed for our homeless friends

Are you interested in driving one Sunday morninga month in order to bring our homeless friends to and from church?  Please contact Mandy Hill at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com for more information.

 

this week's announcements

annual church picnic

Our picnic is this Sunday, August 6th from 11:30am-1:30pm.  There is no regular church this day.  We'll meet at Shawnee Mission Park, Shelter #8 for lunch and fun!  We provide the fried chicken and watermelon!  Please bring a side dish to share!

 

mobile food pantry this saturday, august 5th at 1pm

Our mobile food pantry on the first Saturday of each month. Fresh produce is available for families in need. If you know anyone who would benefit from bags of fresh fruits & vegetables, send them our way. The pantry opens in the parking lot at 1:00pm. If you would like to volunteer, please arrive at 12:30pm. The commitment is about 1 1/2 hours. Questions, contact Mandy mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com

 

ladies’ night out

Next Tuesday, August 8th at 7pm is Ladies Night Out at K-Machos in Olathe. This is a great opportunity to meet & connect with Redemption women. For more information or to reserve a spot, contact Ari Martin (913-426-8603 or arimartin1@yahoo.com) or Melissa Guinto (319-230-0522 or mguinto72@gmail.com)

 

sunday morning drivers for our homeless friends

If you might be interested in driving on a Sunday morning in order to bring our homeless friends to and from church on Sundays, please contact Mandy Hill at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com.

 

this week's announcements

summer calendar

July 30—Youth Group Fund Raiser: Frisbee Golf Scramble

August 6—Annual Church Picnic

August 8-Ladies' Night Out at K-Machos

August 18(new date)—Club 56 Backyard Bash

August 20– Promotion Sunday (to Kindergarten & 5th grade)

 

frisbee golf scramble/youth fundraiser!

This Sunday, July 30, at 5pm is our first annual golf scramble, raising money for our 2017/18 school programs.  We are playing the Prairie Center Park Frisbee golf course. This event is for all ages, and is great for a fun family outing!  Please register on our church website:  redemptionchurchkc.com

 

annual church picnic

Our church picnic is next Sunday, August 6th from 11:30am-1:30pm.  There is no regular church this day.  We'll meet at Shawnee Mission Park, Shelter #8 for lunch and fun!  We provide the fried chicken, watermelon and drinks.  Please bring a side dish to share!

 

mobile food pantry saturday, august 5th at 1pm

We host a mobile food pantry on the first Saturday of each month. Fresh produce is available for families in need. If you know anyone who would benefit from a few bags of fresh fruits & vegetables, send them our way. The pantry opens in the parking lot at 1:00pm. If you would like to volunteer, please arrive at 12:30pm. The commitment is about 1 1/2 hours. Questions, please contact Mandy Hill at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com

 

ladies’ night out

Tuesday, August 8th at 7pm is Ladies Night Out at K-Machos in Olathe. This is a great opportunity to meet & connect with Redemption women. For more information or to reserve a spot, contact Ari Martin (913-426-8603 or arimartin1@yahoo.com) or Melissa Guinto (319-230-0522 or mguinto72@gmail.com)

 

sunday morning drivers for our homeless friends

If you might be interested in driving on a Sunday morning in order to bring our homeless friends to and from church on Sundays, please contact Mandy Hill at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com.

 

 

this week's announcements

summer calendar

July 30—Youth Group Fund Raiser: Frisbee Golf Scramble

August 6—Annual Church Picnic

August 11 (new date)—Club 56 Backyard Bash

August 20– Promotion Sunday (to Kindergarten & 5th grade)

 

* There is no men's breakfast in August.

 

frisbee golf scramble/youth fundraiser!

Sunday, July 30, at 5pm is our first annual golf scramble, raising money for our 2017/18 school programs.  We are playing the Prairie Center Park Frisbee golf course. This event is for all ages, and is great for a fun family outing!  Please register on our church website:  redemptionchurchkc.com

 

annual church picnic

Our church picnic is Sunday, August 6th from 11:30am-1:30pm.  There is no regular church this day.  We'll meet at Shawnee Mission Park, Shelter #8 for lunch and fun!  We provide the fried chicken and watermelon.  Please bring a side dish to share!

 

mobile food pantry saturday, august 5th at 1pm

We host a mobile food pantry on the first Saturday of each month. Fresh produce is available for families in need. If you know anyone who would benefit from a few bags of fresh fruits & vegetables, send them our way. The pantry opens in the parking lot at 1:00pm. If you would like to volunteer, please arrive at 12:30pm. The commitment is about 1 1/2 hours. Questions, please contact Mandy Hill at mandy@redemptionchurchkc.com

 

this week's announcements

summer calendar

July 30—Youth Group Fund Raiser: Frisbee Golf Scramble

August 6—Annual Church Picnic

August 11—Club 56 Backyard Bash (Date Changed)

August 20– Promotion Sunday (to Kindergarten & 5th grade)

 

frisbee golf scramble/youth fundraiser!

Sunday, July 30, at 5pm is our first annual golf scramble, raising money for our 2017/18 youth group programs.  We are playing the Prairie Center Park Frisbee golf course. This event is for all ages, and is great for a fun family outing!  Please register by clicking here! 

 

annual church picnic

Our church picnic is Sunday, August 6th from 11:30am-1:30pm.  There is no regular church this day.  We'll meet at Shawnee Mission Park, Shelter #8 for lunch and fun!  We provide the fried chicken.  Please bring a side dish to share!

 

yoga with jenny!

Jenny Evans is leading yoga classes every Saturday morning from 10am-11am in the A-Frame.  $5 minimum suggested donation.  All levels welcome!

 

redemption emails

If you would like to be added to our church email list to keep up with weekly announcements and periodic information, please mark the card below and drop it in the offering basket or sign up on our website: redemptionchurchkc.com